It’s All About Grades

(And Course Selection, the Right High School, and more!) The decisions your 9th or 10th grader makes this year could have a major impact on whether or not they get into the college they want. It’s important to understand, as early as possible, the crucial role their GPA plays in college admissions. In many ways, to a college admission office, your son or daughter is their transcript. It shows the school their courses and grades — it’s one of the top factors in most college admissions … and it could go a long way to determining whether an Acceptance Letter or a Rejection arrives in your mail. iStock_000013673388_ExtraSmall-e1368724158164-1Good grades … Great courses … and More When your child applies to a college, the school looks for two things first: high grades and challenging courses. To have a shot at a top college (a really selective school), your student needs great grades in the most challenging courses. An “A” in woodworking isn’t going to impress a top college, nor is a “C” in AP Calculus.  Here’s what Admissions Reps look for … Coursework’s degree of difficulty – within the context of your school. Grade patterns – a direct comparison between first and second semester, and year to year. Grade trends – did your grades improve as you advanced each year or did they go down? Additional academic experiences – community college, summer programs, independent study? Choose your courses carefully! When college admissions calculate GPA, they’ll often focus solely on core subjects (math, science, English, social studies, and foreign language). Grades for Phys-Ed, Music, and other non-core courses aren’t given the same weight. Of course, colleges realize that not all high schools have the same academic standards, and they take that into consideration.In fact, colleges receive an academic profile from every high school in America — over 40,000. Your school’s profile shows all the classes offered, including college prep courses, Advanced Placement (AP), or honors/accelerated classes. So, basically, you’ve got to make sure your child has the whole package – good grades, the right courses, and the right school experiences. *Source: NACAC Admission Trends Survey 2011

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