The Takeaway Wk of 4/27

Here’s a summary of important articles from the past week that may give you more insight into the world of college life, admissions, financing, and parenting.

 

Teen StressPlease, Don’t Crush the Students
The R2C Takeaway: Mixed messages are being to sent to many of the students living in affluent, very competitive areas such as Palo Alto, CA, and these messages are being sent by parents and school officials. On the one hand everyone wants their student to be “happy” and on the other hand they want them to be “the best.” These two often collide and are harming our children and stressing them out–often with very dire outcomes. A major dilemma adults must battle with: “Does a culture of hyperachievement deserve any blame” for all the damage being done?

 

In Praise of the Teen Summer Job
The R2C Takeaway: An “old-timer” reminisces about his way-back-when summer days when high school students were involved with actual manual labor rather than off on European teen tours and humanitarian stints in third world countries.

 

5 Best College Admission Blogs
The R2C Takeaway: It’s very difficult to narrow down the list of blogs and websites a parent (and student ) should be reading to supply them with all the information they need about college admission and financial aid. These five blogs (of which we are one) will cover all the bases, and hopefully lower your stress level…even just a little.

 

Teens Influenced By Alcohol Marketing More Likely to Report Dangerous Drinking
The R2C Takeaway: “Alcohol is the most commonly used drug among youths in the United States and is responsible, on average, for the deaths of 4,300 underage persons each year.” It’s no secret that teens are very impressionable and studies have found that when it comes to alcohol, advertising and the media are having more of an influence over them than we’d like. Steps must be taken to find ways to counteract the negative influence with more positive messages.

 

How I Got Into An Ivy League School 
The R2C Takeaway: The odds of getting into an Ivy League school are pretty low, but gleaning information about the backgrounds and attributes of those who did gain acceptance can be helpful with any college search. Many of the students profiled in this article are first generation college students whose grades and scores were not necessarily the top, but each of them showed commitment to extra-curricular programs that set them apart from others. All are driven and have an  exceptional work ethic.

 

College For the Masses
The R2C Takeaway: The belief that at-risk students, those who fall just below the bar of admitted students, should not attend four-year schools has been shattered by recent studies. Data has shown that these students not only succeed in four-year programs, but they complete them at a higher rate than if they had initially started at a community college. “Students do better when they stretch themselves and attend the most selective college that admits them, rather than undermatching.”

 

 

 

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