The Takeaway Wk of 2/15

Here’s a summary of important articles from the week of 2/15/15 that may give you more insight into the world of college life, admissions, financing, and parenting.

 

How Scholarship App SCHOLLY Sparked A Big Fight On Shark Tank

Scholly Scholarship AppThe R2C TakeawayDrexel University undergrad Christopher Gray, founder of scholarship app Scholly, caused a catfight on ABC’s “Shark Tank” after two investors — Lori Greiner and Daymond John — aggressively pursued a $40,000 investment before Gray could answer many questions about his business plan.

 

AP Courses: Parents’ Perspective

The R2C Takeaway: While many parents and students wrestle with the decisions surrounding AP courses, the consensus is that they do enhance not only a student’s resume in the eyes of college admissions officials, but in addition, they provide both an intellectual challenge and a valuable learning experience. Regarding how many, three to five AP courses during the course of a student’s high school years is more than acceptable.

 

Colleges Use “Bag of Tricks” to Juice Application Numbers

The R2C Takeaway: In order to up their applicant numbers and thereby seemingly enhance their reputation, many universities are resorting to things like lowering their application fees and decreasing the number of  required essays. Experts advise students to keep in mind that selectivity rates no longer mean what they meant in the past, so they should not let these numbers sway them.

 

College Students Facing Depression Need More Than Just a List of Doctors to Call

The R2C Takeaway: Keeping in mind that many students have their first experience with mental illness during their college years, colleges need to be better equipped to handle these issues when they arise. College students and their parents should remember to check out mental health facilities as carefully as they investigate dorms and recreational facilities when they go on college tours, and not be hesitant to ask hard, probing questions regarding the services schools offer.

 

Students Encouraged to Apply to College, While in Class

The R2C Takeaway: It’s no secret that students who don’t apply have zero chance of getting into colleges, so there is a growing campaign in many high schools to help those students who are most hampered by either disinterest, lack of parental involvement or access to a home computer apply during school hours. Organizers estimate the campaign last fall helped 153,000 students from 2,500 high schools apply to college.

 

College’s Priceless Value

The R2C Takeaway: With the high cost of college and the competition to get a lucrative job once you graduate, it would be very irresponsible to think that you shouldn’t focus on the practical reasons for attending. But students should also take advantage of the opportunity to broaden their horizons both intellectually and for the common good. College can be a steppingstone for all of that and when schools encourage the inclusion of one with the exclusion of the other, they are doing a huge disservice to society.

 

Fitting in on Campus: Challenges for First-Generation Students

The R2C Takeaway: Students who are the first ones in their family to attend college often lack having someone close to turn to for experiential advice and guidance. Colleges should be making an effort to reach out and mentor those students who may not have as easy a time of fitting in as others.

 

Campus Bike Recycling Programs Give Cash-Strapped Students a Ride

The R2C Takeaway: In an example of one man’s treasure being another man’s treasure, bicycles that have been abandoned on college campuses are being given a second life as many campus groups are refurbishing and giving them to students who would otherwise have no means of transportation.

 

 

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