The Takeaway Wk of 8/10

Here’s a summary of important articles from the past week that may give you more insight into the world of college life, admissions, financing, and parenting. 

 

Scholarships with August & September DeadlinesScholarships with August and September Deadlines

The R2C Takeaway: Those student who are looking for money to pay for college will be happy to know that there are still scholarships with August and September 2015 deadlines. The 18 on this list are top-notch, but time is running out, so don’t wait to apply.

 

The 10 Types of Roommates You’ll Meet in College
The R2C Takeaway: Whether you’ve shared a room with someone before or not, having a college roommate is quite a different animal, and a good piece of advice is to expect just about anything. Amongst the most common are the ones roommates may encounter are: those who will never be there, those who will never leave the room, the sharers, the party animals, and those whose sleeping schedules are topsy-turvy. Learning how to deal with all the different personalities is a good life lesson, and this how-to will be helpful.

The Science of the Teenage Brain:
The R2C Takeaway: Attributing adolescent behavior to “adolescence” is, according to scientists, wrong. The teenage brain is constantly in flux, “pruning” away parts and growing others. It is up to adults to help them with that growth and steer it in the right direction. Teaching them about “Emotional Intelligence” is one way in which adults can make a major difference in their lives.

Finding a Career Track in LinkedIn Profiles
The R2C Takeaway: LinkedIn has made a concerted effort to reach out to younger users and many universities are partnering with the platform to encourage students to use their site as well. Students must not think of college as merely a weigh station in life; those years should be used for exploration and research in terms of finding a career path. Checking LinkedIn contacts can give someone a good idea of how they got where they are now and help qnswer questions like: “What jobs are available in a particular occupation? What type of experiences do I need to get a job in those professions? What did people who have those jobs study in college?”

 

 

 

 

 

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