What to Do When You’ve Been Rejected from Your Dream School

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What to Do When You’ve Been Rejected from Your Dream School

The college application process is something that we only have to go through once…if we are lucky. It can be exhausting, defeating, and upsetting. However, college is an investment.

 

An investment in one’s self, time, and finances. It is a decision that deserves a lot of thought and energy.

 

It is also extremely important to balance dreams and realities. Because sometimes we don’t get into the school we want. 

 

What do you do then?

 

 

Details are Important

College application season can be a very stressful time for not only students, but also their families. There are many factors to consider when deciding on which schools to apply to.

 

For instance, understanding admissions statistics is important. Numbers don’t lie when it comes to college acceptances.

 

Admissions rates, average test scores, GPAs, and amount of in-state vs out-of-state acceptances are all metrics you can and should assess in your application process. Acknowledging these numbers helps keep college acceptance goals in reality.

 

Most students are advised to apply to safety schools, reach schools, and some that fall in between. However, a “safety” school doesn’t just have to be a school that is “easy” to be accepted into.

 

It may be a school close to home, reducing costs of tuition, housing, and traveling. The same goes for “reach” schools. A reach school is usually a university with a relatively low acceptance rate, and it may come with a heftier price tag, putting it even more out of reach.

 

As you work through the application process, keep these factors in mind. Accepting the realities that come with college acceptances can be difficult but it is actually a humbling experience.

 

 

Beyond the Numbers

One thing that I find important when applying to universities is looking into honors colleges and major-specific programs. This can make a regular college experience more personalized and challenging for students who want it.

 

And an honors program at a lower-cost or in-state school can be just as prestigious as that big name school that rejected you. 

 

These specific programs can also open up opportunities for scholarships.

 

Also, when considering applying to reach schools, it is important to understand the dynamics at these prestigious institutions. While these institutions are respectable and receive high accolades, this status makes it much more difficult to stand out and make a mark.

 

At a public institution, there are more opportunities for to achieve new things and reach the “top” much faster.

 

 

Rejection Hurts, but Also Helps

When I was rejected from the University of Southern California –an outrageously expensive and high-demand school– I was heartbroken. It is a prestigious accomplishment to be accepted.

 

But there’s an upside to being rejected from these types of institutions. While highly regarded, the student body isn’t that diverse, academically, like you might find at a different public institution.

 

At these “less prestigious” schools, there is more room at the top since not the entire school is the top. There is more room to grow.

 

When everyone is the smartest in the room, it is much harder to get anywhere. Not to mention, being in a room filled with diverse economic and academic backgrounds makes you more well-rounded. That can even help your future career!  

 

Being rejected from a top university is difficult. You will always wonder if your GPA wasn’t high enough or if your essay wasn’t good enough. However, it is not the end of the world and it is not the worst thing that could happen.

 

It can be a great reality check and it can open so many doors you didn’t think possible.

 

 

After Rejection

Investing in a university that allows room for growth and  opportunity to experience a diverse community is one of the smartest things you can do.

 

Most public universities have commendable academic programs, but you won’t know unless you research. In fact, researching academic programs is a great way to learn more about a university.

 

It is also important to look at the university, particularly the majors they offer, as a whole. Chances are you will change your major. Given that, you’ll want attend a school that has many great options.

 

That’ll make it easier to switch, should you change your mind about what you want to study.

 

Additionally, employers care less and less about where potential employees attend school. When looking at schools, the social dynamics (clubs, sports, fraternities and sororities, etc) should count as well as the academics.

 

You want a school that meets all your needs, not just one that’s exclusive.

 

Dreams and realities are difficult to balance. More and more prospective college students have one school in mind that is their absolute dream school.

 

Growing up in Los Angeles, all I wanted to do was to go to USC and become a Trojan. However, that just wasn’t a reality for me.

 

I ended up in the right place for me, and I wouldn’t change the way it went.

  

 

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This post was written by Brett Holzhauer, a graduate of the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Arizona State University. He enjoy writing about personal finance, travel, and higher education. In his spare time, he enjoys traveling with his wife, eating questionable Mexican food, and watching college football.


Road2College

Road2College

Debbie Schwartz is former financial services executive and founder of Road2College and the Paying For College 101 Facebook group. She's dedicated to providing families with trustworthy information about college admissions and paying for college. With data, tools and access to experts she's helping families become educated consumers of higher ed.
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